Protecting Your Device From Hackers and Spies.

Got nothing to hide? Think again

 

Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to secule themselves, or information about themselves, and thereby expressing themselves selectively. Privacy is what set us different from animals. With the increase in rising technology and coders, the data we have or save claims more liable to the world to be accessible. Do you know that, even the data saved to your note pad can also be hacked? , yes you heard it right.

There is no such thing as perfect security. But no matter who you are or where you are in the world, there are a lots of thing you can do, many of which are simple, to protect yourself from the hacker world.  Here are some tricks and tips to protect your personal data from hackers and spies.

 

SECURE YOUR DEVICES

Your phone is your ultimate endpoint. You carry it everywhere and it usually holds your most personal secrets and sensitive information.iPhones are widely seen as the most secure mainstream device today. Modern and newer Android devices usually come with strong security features, but there isn’t a universal implementation of encryption yet. Your iPhone encrypts as soon as you lock your screen (even the feds can’t access it), but Android devices have to be shut down entirely.

 

TURN OFF FINGERPRINT PHONE UNLOCK

Your Touch ID or fingerprint sensor is meant to keep your data more secure. But in some cases federal agents can force you to unlock your phone with your fingerprint, because the courts have determined that it’s not a violation of the Fifth Amendment, which protects against self-incrimination. The feds however can’t force you to turn over your passcode.

 

BE MINDFUL OF EVERY APP YOU INSTALL

Each time you install an app, it will ask you for permissions to your phone’s features or data, like your contacts, photos, camera, or even the phone dialer itself. Be mindful of apps that you install, as a single rogue app can punch a hole in your privacy protections.

Take Meitu, the anime photo app that whipped up a privacy storm. For such a simple app, it required almost unlimited and unfettered access to your phone. Remember: if an app is free, you’re paying for it in some other way — and usually it’s with your data

 

SET A STRONG PASSCODE

Chances are you’re already using a six-digit passcode, if you’re using a modern version of iOS. But you can make the code as long as you like. We have a simple and handy guide here. Choosing the “custom numeric code” will still give you the number keypad on the lock screen, making the passcode entry easier to type in.

 

USE A COMPUTER? TAKE THIS ADVICE

Keeping your devices and apps up to date will significantly reduce attacks. Every app or service you install will increase your vulnerability risks because no software is perfect. If you have preinstalled apps or “bloatware,” you should remove those — and that includes web plugins like Adobe’s Flash, Oracle’s Java, and Apple’s QuickTime. Using ad-blockers can prevent ads from installing tracking cookies and even malware (which happens surprisingly often).

You should also consider encrypting your computer, which is easy if you use either Windows or a Mac. Just make sure you don’t upload your encryption keys to the cloud, otherwise Microsoft or Apple could be forced to turn them over.

Yes, Windows 10 is more secure than Windows 7, but it’s understandable that many think it’s a privacy nightmare. We have a separate Windows 10 privacy guide that shows you the right options for you.

 

SECURE YOUR MESSAGING
Now that your device is secure, you should think about your data in-transit — that is, as it traverses the waves of the wireless spectrum and the pipes of the internet.

SMS messages and phone calls can be intercepted and wiretapped at any time — it’s the law. Police can also use cell-site simulators (known as “stingrays”) to force-downgrade your cell connection from LTE to non-encrypted channels to make it easier to snoop on your phone.

It’s not just the messages you send that you need to worry about; you also have to think about the data that’s generated as a result — so-called metadata, such as who you’re talking to, when, and sometimes where. That information alone can tell a lot about your life, which is why it’s so important to intelligence services. Metadata is a core pillar of government surveilence  

 

SECURE YOUR BROWSING
Browsing is usually at the heart of what most people do. But just as you’re looking out at the world, you also have a lot trying to look in. Ad networks will track you from site to site, your internet provider will log which pages you visit, and hackers will try to target you.

Without getting too into the weeds, no browser is perfect, but some are better than others.

When it comes to the gold standard of privacy, consider using Tor. It’s like a regular browser with privacy benefits, and it’s often used by the privacy conscious, such as reporters and activists.

Tor Browser is a great tool for secure and private browsing. But remember, be careful with plugins and browser extensions as these will significantly weaken the browser’s security. (Image: ZDNet)

The Tor browser lets its users browse the internet anonymously by bouncing traffic through multiple relays. Not only does it hide a user’s internet history, it’s also used to circumvent state-sanctioned network blocks. The service also allows users to browse parts of the dark web, which aren’t accessible through traditional browsers and networks, as well as websites and services that are blocked in your region.

You can use Tor for anything — but streaming video can be slow, and some web plugins (like Flash) are generally disabled as these can be used to de-anonymize you, defeating the point altogether.

With other browsers, to enhance your security, you can install the HTTPS Everywhere plugin (available for most popular browsers), which forces websites that support website encryption to turn it on by default.

Secure sites are your friend, because it means an attacker can’t modify the pages and that internet providers (and the government) can’t see which individual web pages you visit on a domain.

You can also use mobile versions of the Tor browser called Orbot for Android and Onion Browser for iOS, both of which are also open source.

Both of these apps are widely used and trusted by leading security researchers.

 

PUBLIC WI-FI NETWORKS ARE A BIG ‘NO’

Remember: If you ever use a public network, like a Wi-Fi hotspot in a coffee shop or anywhere else, be extremely careful. Treat this network as though every page you visit will be monitored — which may expose your personal information, including your usernames and passwords.

 

USE YOUR PHONE’S DATA FOR BETTER SECURITY

If you need a secure network, you should use your phone’s data — such as 4G or LTE — or use your phone as a hotspot for your computer. It’s far better to use your phone’s data plan for anything important than using insecure public Wi-Fi.

 

Here are all I got to know, if you have more tips and taps then plese let us know int the comment section below.

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